Teacher reads to students live on Facebook 1 Day After Brain Surgery: ‘I Wanted To See You’

I just need you to see that I love you and remember you, “K.K Meucci, a Grade 4 teacher in Pennsylvania, told her students during a Facebook Live video.

A Pennsylvania-based teacher had his students under his control while he was recovering from cerebrum treatment.

Just a day after going on a journey to end cerebrum growth, K. Meucci – a Grade 4 teacher at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in Bethel Park – never missed a news session with her online comprehension session and appeared on Facebook Live to help her students, reports WTAE-TV.

Meucci had founded the Facebook bunch years ago as another way for teachers and students to get together by reading bedtime stories together, according to a news source.

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“Obviously I pressed the book,” Meucci said in a Facebook Live video shot in the emergency room bed Thursday. “I realized I would be here Thursday night, so I pressed a letter from the library.”

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The letter Meucci decided on the occasion was Mr. Walker Steps Out by Lisa Graff, a youth story around a captive man living inside a box of robots.

Appearing on Facebook Live, in addition to the fact that Meucci hoped that his students would receive a pledge with a text message to discover the value of humanity in the world, he also needed them to clearly see the value they intended for him and for.

“Most of all, I needed to see you [you] to see if I was okay. I look surprised, but I needed you to see and see that I was okay,” she told her readers in the video. “I just need you to realize that I love you and miss you.”

Meucci told WTAE-TV that experts agree to rule out every bit of her cancer, saying it’s “safe.”

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Previous WCW Wrestler Daffney Unger Dead at 46 After Concerning Instagram Live Video

Former expert Daffney Unger kicked off a 46-year-old bucket, a few wrestling developments with WWE at Fox have confirmed.

Unger’s mother Jean Tookey Spruill (real grappler’s name was Shannon Spruill) also confirmed her death, posting on Facebook, “I’m so sorry I have to tell you that my daughter Shannon Spruill… Scream Queen Daff, passed away suddenly last night. The grief is over.”

On Wednesday, Unger started worrying after he did an Instagram Live show he was carrying what appeared to be a small gun. In his video, which has been re-posted, Unger clearly assessed the symptoms of progressive encephalopathy (CTE), a debilitating mental illness brought on by the blackout.

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“The most important thing I have to remember is that CTE, with head injuries and power outages, can be just now -” Unger said in the video, before stopping for a few breaths. “Now they can be analyzed as long as you are dead.”

“In line with this, I prefer not to damage my brain properly. I need to be considered,” he continued. “I need people who will know in the future. Try not to behave like me.”

After Instagram Live, former ace actor Mick Foley used Twitter to ask people to help find Unger.

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“In case anyone has a way to get to Daffney Unger, or knows where he is, help him kindly,” Foley said. “You’re in a horrible situation and you’re taking steps to injure yourself. My phone is straight to the voice.”

Shine Wrestling announced Unger’s death Thursday morning in a message from his colleague, Lexie Fyfe. Web-based media accounts associated with WWE additionally present a recommendation to the former grappler, who started in 1999 at WCW and moreover held a prominent position in TNA.

The WWE, which bought the WCW in 2001, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Fyfe told the New York Daily News that Unger was found Thursday morning, adding, “This is the last business, I don’t need to describe him. He will always need people who can connect to get help and monitor those who are depressed. We will miss him.”

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“I am very sorry to hear of Daffney’s passing,” Foley said Thursday morning. “It’s a terrible tragedy for his family, for those he meets and for fighting him. He was far ahead of his time in our business. #RIPDaffney

Unger was “a man who loved to have fun,” Fyfe told the Daily News, noting that his friend was “made for fighting.”

“At a time when he needed to clear up due to injuries, he missed a lot,” Fyfe said. “You will also miss out as a entertainer, and as a partner, but for the most part as a partner.”

As shown by the Centers for Disease Control, power outages with serious injuries caused by a blow to the head or body cause the brain to overflow. Stargazing organizations, alongside the NFL, have had to contend with the CTE issue among their rivals due to various morning passes.

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, if it is not a big problem, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255),
Last week, Meucci underwent a medical procedure to remove the metal, which he said was “harmless”, and is currently recovering on Pittsburgh TV.

The day after her medical procedure, Meucci returned to what she loved: reading to her students. In her clinic bed, the teacher read to the children a book on her Facebook bunch, Franklin Bedtime Stories.

“I’m sorry if I look strange, I can see I look strange. I found this injured eye here because they re-opened my head here to get my brain cancer out,” he explained.

He also made an act of promising his students that he would return to school soon.

“Especially I needed to see you, to see that I was fine. I look surprised, but I needed you to see and see that I was healthy,” he said.

Meucci said experts thought they had a chance to get all the cancer and that she was still recovering, the WTAE reported.

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